Photo of Peter Cramer

Peter Cramer is an associate in the Corporate Department and a member of the Technology, Media & Telecommunications Group.

Peter earned his J.D. from Columbia Law School in 2021, where he was honored as a James Kent Scholar and received the Michael D. Remer Memorial Prize for Excellence in Copyright and Art Law. At Columbia, Peter served as co-President of the Entertainment, Art and Sports Law Society; as coach of AIPLA, Columbia's intellectual property moot court team; and as a staffer for the Columbia Journal of Law and the Arts.

Peter received his B.A. from Wesleyan University in 2014, where his senior thesis documentary film earned him Departmental Honors and the Best Documentary Award from the Film Studies Department. After college, he was nominated for an Emmy for his work on the documentary film American Experience: The Mine Wars. Peter was born and raised in Massachusetts.

Last week, OpenAI rolled out ChatGPT Team, a flexible subscription structure for small-to-medium sized businesses (with two or more users) that are not large enough to warrant the expense of a ChatGPT Enterprise subscription (which requires a minimum of 150 licensed users).  Despite being less expensive than its Enterprise counterpart, ChatGPT Team provides for the use of the latest OpenAI models with the robust privacy, security and confidentiality protections that previously only applied to the ChatGPT Enterprise subscription and which are far more protective than the terms that govern ordinary personal accounts. This development could be the proverbial “game changer” for smaller businesses, as for the first time, they can have access to tools previously only available to OpenAI Enterprise customers, under OpenAI’s more favorable Business Terms and the privacy policies listed on the Enterprise Privacy page, without making the financial or technical commitment required under an Enterprise relationship. 

Thus, for example, ChatGPT Team customers would be covered by the Business Terms’ non-training commitment (OpenAI’s Team announcement states: “We never train on your business data or conversations”), and by other data security controls, as well as Open AI’s “Copyright Shield,” which offers indemnity for customers in the event that a generated output infringes third party IP.[1] Moreover, under the enterprise-level privacy protections, customers can also create custom GPT models that are for in-house use and not shared with anyone else.

As noted above, until now, the protections under the OpenAI Business Terms were likely beyond reach for many small and medium sized businesses, either because of the financial commitment required by OpenAI’s Enterprise agreement or because of the unavailability of the technical infrastructure necessary to implement the OpenAI API Service. In the past, such smaller entities might resort to having employees use free or paid OpenAI products under individual accounts, with internal precautions (like restrictive AI policies) in place to avoid confidentiality and privacy concerns.[2]

As we’ve seen over the last year, one generative AI provider’s rollout of a new product, tool or contractual protection often results in other providers following suit. Indeed, earlier this week Microsoft announced that it is “expanding Copilot for Microsoft 365 availability to small and medium-sized businesses.” With businesses of all sizes using, testing or developing custom GAI products to stay abreast with the competition, we will watch for future announcements from other providers about more flexible licensing plans for small-to-medium sized businesses.

On December 19, 2023, AI research company Anthropic announced that it had updated and made publicly available its Commercial Terms of Service (effective Jan 1, 2024) to, among other things, indemnify its enterprise Claude API customers from copyright infringement claims made against them for “their authorized use of our services

In a previous post, we highlighted three key items to look out for when assessing the terms and conditions of generative artificial intelligence (“GAI”) tools: training rights, use restrictions and responsibility for outputs. With respect to responsibility for outputs specifically, we detailed Microsoft’s shift away, through its Copilot Copyright Commitment (discussed in greater detail below), from the blanket disclaimer of all responsibility for GAI tools’ outputs that we initially saw from most GAI providers.

In the latest expansion of intellectual property protection offered by a major GAI provider, OpenAI’s CEO Sam Altman announced to OpenAI “DevDay” conference attendees that “we can defend our customers and pay the costs incurred if you face legal claims around copyright infringement, and this applies both to ChatGPT Enterprise and the API.”

In the first half of 2023, a deluge of new generative artificial intelligence (“GAI”) tools hit the market, with companies ranging from startups to tech giants rolling out new products. In the large language model space alone, we have seen OpenAI’s GPT-4, Meta’s LLaMA, Anthropic’s Claude 2, Microsoft’s Bing AI, and others.

A proliferation of tools has meant a proliferation of terms and conditions. Many popular tools have both a free version and a paid version, which each subject to different terms, and several providers also have ‘enterprise’ grade tools available to the largest customers. For businesses looking to trial GAI, the number of options can be daunting.

This article sets out three key items to check when evaluating a GAI tool’s terms and conditions. Although determining which tool is right for a particular business is a complex question that requires an analysis of terms and conditions in their entirety – not to mention nonlegal considerations like pricing and technical capabilities – the below items can provide prospective customers with a starting place, as well as bellwether to help spot terms and conditions that are more or less aggressive than the market standard.

Competition between Amazon’s third-party merchants is notoriously fierce. The online retail giant often finds itself playing the role of referee, banning what it considers unfair business practices (such as offering free products in exchange for perfect reviews, or targeting competitors with so-called “review bombing”). Last month, in the latest round

Web 3.0 and the promise of the metaverse has generated excitement about new markets for businesses large and small. But as with any technological frontier, legal uncertainties cause new risks to emerge alongside the opportunities. One area currently full of legal questions is trademark law. We will examine what we